Guide The Urban Food Revolution: Changing the Way We Feed Cities

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The next step would be to assess soil being removed from construction sites and banking it somewhere for delivery to urban farms in need of good soil.

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In Canada, changes to federal meat inspection standards for abattoirs effectively shut down local meat production in many areas. The costs and loss of product identification that comes with shipping livestock to distant, centralized slaughterhouses caused some smaller meat producers to pack it in. Some are re-entering the black market in sheer defiance of regulations; others are counting on a more understanding application of rules intended for large operations such as providing separate washrooms for inspectors.

The shutdown of the Estrella Family Creamery in southwest Washington illustrates the impact of safety regulations on smaller producers. A bigger, better-capitalized operation could much more easily rebound from a hit like this. Estrella is fighting back in court, forbidden to sell a lot of the cheese it had produced. In , when FDA inspectors found Listeria in soft cheese samples, half of the 24 farms where it was discovered were artisan producers. But what if a pathogen is present in such small amounts that no one gets ill? The level of risk is far greater in large national operations than in small operations, just based on the number of people exposed to the products.

The industry fears food freedom.

The Urban Food Revolution

The bureaucracy is there to protect the status quo. It has more realistic standards for small farms and mom-and-pop producers that sell directly to consumers via venues such as roadside stands, farmers markets and community supported agricultural programs. Food safety is a much bigger issue than simply checking for contaminated food that causes illness.

What about excessive soda consumption that causes diabetes? Excessive sodium consumption in snack foods that causes heart disease? Only with the new Food Safety Modernization Act will US imported foods be subject to the same standards as local food. When it comes to fresh local produce, contamination is a low risk. Amid all that capriciousness about what gets inspected is a simple truth: local food can always be traced to its source, so it offers a greater chance for the consumer to know if the grower can be trusted. Consumers understand this. Food grown in contaminated soils in and around cities, especially root crops, can be unsafe to eat.

Urban food growers should have their soil tested, or they can avoid the issue by using raised beds with fresh, safe compost. Air-borne pollutants from city-grown food can be washed off. Smaller local producers are just as capable of producing contaminated food as large producers, even if their impact is limited.

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Consumers prefer local food because they perceive it as safer. They have a better chance of knowing how local food is grown than they do with imported food. Want to gain a fresh perspective? Read stories that matter? Feel optimistic about the future?


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Urban Food Revolution "Urban Food Revolution" provides a recipe for community food security based on leading innovations across North America. Continue Reading. Share your thoughts. Related Content. Put 'Em Up! Add to cart. New on Utne Reader: June 1. Bridging Colonialism and Climate Change. Peter Ladner has more than 35 years of journalistic experience in print, radio and television and is a frequent speaker on business and community issues. He is also a director of The Natural Step Canada.

The urban food revolution : changing the way we feed cities / Peter Ladner.

As part of his focus on the intersection of food policy and city planning, Peter initiated a program to create 2, new food-producing community garden plots to coincide with the Olympics. A lifelong vegetable gardener, he has replaced his own front lawn in urban Vancouver with a productive food garden. Table of Contents Preface Book is about how cities in the developed world can be better planned, zoned, built, expanded, from the point of view of massively increasing local food production, storage, processing and equitable distribution. See All Customer Reviews.

The Urban Food Revolution: Changing the Way We Feed Cities

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Peter Ladner- Urban Food Revolution

USD Sign in to Purchase Instantly. Overview Our reliance on industrial agriculture has resulted in a food supply riddled with hidden environmental, economic, and health care costs and beset by rising food prices. He describes how cities are bringing food production home by: Growing community through neighborhood gardening, cooking, and composting programs Rebuilding local food processing, storage, and distribution systems Investing in farmers markets and community supported agriculture Reducing obesity through local fresh food initiatives in schools, colleges, and universities Ending inner-city food deserts Producing food locally makes people healthier, alleviates poverty, creates jobs, and makes cities safer and more beautiful.

About the Author Peter Ladner has more than 35 years of journalistic experience in print, radio and television and is a frequent speaker on business and community issues. Show More. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. Billings' local food scene is bootstrapping and standing tall.

Renowned restaurants like TEN boast menus Renowned restaurants like TEN boast menus that showcase distinctive local ingredients from trout roe to foraged mushrooms.


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  • Restaurants and artisans source from centuries-old establishments like the McGowan family farm, which provides View Product. Birmingham began as a boomtown filled with immigrants who held on to the best recipes Birmingham began as a boomtown filled with immigrants who held on to the best recipes from their homelands. More recently, locals like Frank Stitt and Carole Griffin helped transform the modern southern city into a foodie destination with the best Revenge is a meal best served in a casserole dish